CHAMINADE Thierry

Name : CHAMINADE
Surname : Thierry
Phone : 04 91 32 40 32
Fonction : Chercheur
Grade : CR1
Office : 1.05

Biography

My main scholarly interest pertains to the evolutionary origins of the uniqueness of human mind. The core hypothesis is that a few evolutionary events added to pre-existing abilities should explain most of human fascinating social abilities, for example empathy, theory of mind, language or skill transmission. In practice, the goal is to naturalize these social abilities by using in vivo investigation of the neurophysiology of these functions with fMRI, combined with behavioral and eyetracking studies, and comparing people with disabilities in social interactions (autism spectrum, schizophrenia).

Social interactions with an artificial agent

The main project aims to understand the neural substrates of social cognition using interactions of humans with other agents, not only human (imitation in particular) but also artificial computer animations and robots to investigate how social cognition deals with the emergence of artificial anthropomorphic agents, such as computer-animated avatars or humanoid and android robots. Humans lack pre-existing concepts about the nature and behavior of these artifacts, and must therefore adapt their social skills to these new types of interactions. In the longer term, these artificial agents hold the promise of being used in therapies, for instance in helping shaping social behaviors of children with autism.

Latest publications

  • ARTICLE DE REVUE: Wykowska, A.*, Chaminade, T.*, Cheng, G. (2016). Embodied artificial agents for understanding human social cognition. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B Biological Science. * equal contribution.
  • Chaminade, T., Da Fonseca, D., Rosset, D., Cheng, G., Deruelle, C. (2015), Atypical modulation of hypothalamic activity by social context in ASD, Research in autism Spectrum Disorder. 10:41-50.
  • Chaminade, T., Rosset, D., Da Fonseca, D., Hodgins, J. K., Deruelle, C. (2015). Anthropomorphic bias found in typically developing children is not found in children with autistic spectrum disorder. Autism. 19(2):248-51.
  • Chaminade, T., Okka, M.M. (2013). Comparing the effect of humanoid and human face for the spatial orientation of attention, Frontiers in Neurorobotics. doi: 10.3389/fnbot.2013.00
  • Chaminade, T., Rosset, D., Da Fonseca, D., Nazarian, B., Lutcher, E., Cheng, G., et al. (2012). How do we think machines think? An fMRI study of alleged competition with an artificial intelligence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 6.
  • Saygin, A., Chaminade, T., Ishiguro, H., Driver, J., Frith, C.D. (2012). The thing that should not be: the perception of human and humanoid robot actions. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. 7(4):413.

Neurophysiology of social cognition In addition to the specific question of interaction with artificial agents, I collaborate on various studies investigating the motor, representational and physiological bases of social interactions in general.

Latest publications

  • Chaminade, T. (2017). An experimental approach to study the physiology of natural social interactions. Interaction Studies.
  • Wolfe, F., Auzias, G., Deruelle, C., Chaminade, T. (2016). Focal atrophy of hypothalamus associated with third ventricle enlargement in Autism Spectrum Disorder. Neuroreport.
  • Silva, C., Chaminade, T., Da Fonseca, D., Soares, I., Santos, A., Deruelle, C. (2015), Attachment style impacts behavioural and early oculomotor response to positive, but not negative, pictures. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology. 56(3):327-34.
  • Chaminade, T., Leutcher, R. H. - V., Millet, V., & Deruelle, C. (2013). fMRI evidence for dorsal stream processing abnormality in adults born preterm. Brain and Cognition, 81(1), 67–72.
  • Chaminade, T., Marchant, J. L., Kilner, J., & Frith, C. D. (2012). An fMRI study of joint action–varying levels of cooperation correlates with activity in control networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 6.
  • Santos, A., Chaminade, T., Da Fonseca, D., Silva, C., Rosset, D., & Deruelle, C. (2011). Just Another Social Scene: Evidence for Decreased Attention to Negative Social Scenes in High-Functioning Autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

The evolutionary origin of Language and tool-making Language and technology are defining human characteristics. With archeologist Dietrich Stout, we explore the evolutionary connections between them using neuroscience. Our hypothesis is that language is a special case of a capacity for complex, hierarchically structured behavior that is also seen in technology. Until now we have focused on the evolutionarily relevant behavior of stone tool-making to assess behavioral, cognitive and neuroanatomical overlap with language. Current projects involve longitudinal investigation of stone-tool making skills acquisition as well as the generalization to other, modern, motor and non-motor skills.

Latest publications

  • Hecht EE, Gutman DA, Kreisheh N, Taylor, SV., Kilner, J, Faisal, A., Bradley B, Chaminade T, Stout D. (2015). Acquisition of Paleolithic toolmaking abilities involves structural remodeling to inferior frontoparietal regions. Brain Structure and Function. 220(4):2315-31.
  • Stout D, Hecht E, Khreisheh N, Bradley B, Chaminade T. (2015). Cognitive demands of lower paleolithic toolmaking. Plos ONE, 10(4):e0121804
  • Stout D. and Chaminade T. (2012). Stone tools, language and the brain in human evolution. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B Biological Science, 367 :75.
  • Stout, D., Passingham, R., Frith, C.D., Apel, J., Chaminade, T. (2011). Technology, expertise, and social cognition in human evolution. European Journal of Neuroscience, 33(7): 1328.

Publications



  • Chaminade T., Da Fonseca D., Rosset D., Cheng G., and Deruelle C. (2015). Atypical modulation of hypothalamic activity by social context in ASD. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 10: 41-50.


  • Chaminade T., Leutcher R.H.-V., Millet V., and Deruelle C. (2013). fMRI evidence for dorsal stream processing abnormality in adults born preterm. Brain and Cognition, 81: 67-72.


  • Chaminade T., Marchant J.L., Kilner J., and Frith C.D. (2012). An fMRI study of joint action–varying levels of cooperation correlates with activity in control networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 6.


  • Chaminade T., Meltzoff A.N., and Decety J. (2002). Does the End Justify the Means? A PET Exploration of the Mechanisms Involved in Human Imitation. NeuroImage, 15: 318-328.


  • Chaminade T. and Okka M.M. (2013). Comparing the effect of humanoid and human face for the spatial orientation of attention. Frontiers in Neurorobotics, 7.


  • Chaminade T., Rosset D., Da Fonseca D., Nazarian B., Lutcher E., Cheng G., and Deruelle C. (2012). How do we think machines think? An fMRI study of alleged competition with an artificial intelligence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 6.


  • Lancia L., Chaminade T., Nguyen N., and Prévot L. (2017). Studying the Link Between Inter-Speaker Coordination and Speech Imitation Through Human-Machine Interactions. ISCA, 859-863.
  • Lancia L., Chaminade T., Nguyen N., and Prévot L. (2017). Prediction versus coupling: testing two different accounts of inter-speaker coordination. .

  • Santos A., Chaminade T., Da Fonseca D., Silva C., Rosset D., and Deruelle C. (2012). Just another social scene: evidence for decreased attention to negative social scenes in high-functioning autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 42: 1790-1798.

  • Stout D., Hecht E., Khreisheh N., Bradley B., and Chaminade T. (2015). Cognitive demands of lower paleolithic toolmaking. PloS One, 10: e0121804.


  • Stout D., Passingham R., Frith C., Apel J., and Chaminade T. (2011). Technology, expertise and social cognition in human evolution. European Journal of Neuroscience, 33: 1328-1338.


  • Wolfe F.H., Deruelle C., and Chaminade T. (2017). Are friends really the family we choose? Local variations of hypothalamus activity when viewing personally known faces. Social Neuroscience, 1-12.


  • Wykowska A., Chaminade T., and Cheng G. (2016). Embodied artificial agents for understanding human social cognition. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 371: 20150375.
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